Listen Live

Health and Safety tips from the City of Ponca City

COVID-19 ISOLATION AND QUARANTINE ISOLATION:
“I know/think I have COVID-19 with symptoms, when can I be around others?”
• You can be around others after 10 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared AND
• You have been fever free for at least 24 hours (without use of fever reducing medication) AND
• Other symptoms of COVID-19 are improving.
“I tested positive but have no symptons, when can I be around others?”
• If you continue to have no symptoms, you can be around others after 10 days have passed since you were tested.
• If you develop symptoms after testing positive, follow the guidance for “I know/think I have COVID-19 with symptoms.”

QUARANTINE:
“I was a “Close Contact” of someone with COVID-19, when can I be around others?”
• You should quarantine (stay home, monitor for symptoms) for 14 days AFTER LAST EXPOSURE. This is based on the time it takes to develop the illness.
• Close Contact means: within 6 feet of the individual for at least 15 minutes
• Even if you test negative for COVID-19 or feel healthy, you should stay home (quarantine) since symptoms may appear 2 to 14 days after exposure to the virus.

A NEGATIVE TEST RESULT DOES NOT MEAN YOU WON’T GET SICK LATER! The sample may have been
collected very early in your infection period and you could test positive later. Negative results do not
release an individual from quarantine or isolation.
Source: Oklahoma State Department of Health

Take the following everyday steps to help avoid the spread of all respiratory viruses:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, throw the tissue away, and then wash your hands.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects or surfaces such as remote controls, tables, counters, light switches, doorknobs, handles, toilets, and sinks.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Stay home if you are sick.
• Stay aware of how you feel. If you start to have difficulty breathing or if you are worried about your health, call your doctor.

For more tips, visit cdc.gov

If you are sick with COVID-19 or think you might have it, take steps to help protect other people from getting sick:
• Stay home except to get medical care. Call the doctor before visiting.
• Separate yourself from others who live with you.
• Wear a mask to protect others.
• Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and clean your hands right away.
• Avoid sharing items with other people in your home, such as towels and bedding. Be sure dishes are washed in hot water or the dishwasher before anyone else uses them.
• Stay aware of how you feel. If you start to have difficulty breathing or if you are worried about your health, call your doctor.

For more tips, visit cdc.gov

Protect your health this flu season.
Healthcare systems could be overwhelmed treating both patients with flu and patients with COVID-19. This means getting a flu vaccine this year is more important than ever. While getting a flu vaccine will not protect against COVID-19 there are many important benefits, such as:
1. Flu vaccines have been shown to reduce the risk of flu illness, hospitalization, and death.
2. Getting a flu vaccine can also save healthcare resources for the care of patients with COVID-19.

For more tips, visit cdc.gov

Stop the spread of germs.
• Wear a mask with two or more layers to stop the spread of COVID-19. Wear the mask over your
nose and mouth and secure it under your chin. Make sure the mask fits snugly against the sides
of your face.
• Stay at least 6 feet away from others who do not live with you. Remember that some people
without symptoms may be able to spread COVID-19 or flu. Keeping 6 feet from others is especially
important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.
• Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Keep hand sanitizer with you and
use it when you are unable to wash your hands.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light
switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
• If surfaces are dirty, clean them. Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection. Then, use
a household disinfectant. Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work.

For more tips, visit cdc.gov